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deficit, and these are decisions that will have real and lasting impacts on the strength and pace of our recovery. economists and business leaders from across the spectrum have said that our economy is poised for progress in 2013. and we've seen signs of this progress over the last several weeks. home prices continue to climb. car sales are at a five-year high. manufacturing has been strong. and we've created more than six million jobs in the last 35 months. but we've also seen the effects that political dysfunction can have on our economic progress. the drawn-out process for resolving the fiscal cliff hurt consumer confidence. the threat of massive automatic cuts have already started to affect business decisions. so we've been reminded that while it's critical for us to cut wasteful spending, we can't just cut our way to prosperity. deep, indiscriminate cuts to things like education and training, energy and national security will cost us jobs, and it will slow down our recovery. it's not the right thing to do for the economy. it's not the right thing for folks who are out there still lo
the real question here is, how do we reduce our deficits in a way that does not hurt the economy right now, but does make sure that as the economy improves that public spending is not -- and deficit spending is not squeeze the out by private investment. for the last couple years the problem has been opposite. we have seen less private investment, so the moneys the federal government has spent have been very important to helping the economy from going into free fall. . there is no doubt that we have to deal with the balanced approach and that's where the debate lies in how we should do that. again, our republican colleagues have said no to the balanced approach. they said no to the plan that we offered to prevent the sequester. they wouldn't allow a vote on the plan we offered to prevent the sequester that's going to hit on march 1 and which our republican colleagues in statement after statement on this floor have said is going to hurt the economy and which we know from the last quarter's economic report is already hurting the economy just because businesses are anticipating the possibility
we are projected to the a big deficit below one of a trillion for the first time in five years. later, the mayor of san antonio and justified -- testifies on capitol hill about immigration policy. some of the automatic spending cuts delayed in december are scheduled to take effect next month. on the next "washington journal," we will talk about those cuts and program such as medicare and social security. severna, 40 5:00 a.m. eastern. our guest is from texas, and at 8:0020, a democratic congressman, henry waxman, of california, on efforts to combat climate change. your phone calls and tweeds, "washington journal," 7:00 a.m. on c-span. president obama announced his plan to avoid automatic spending cuts known as sequestration scheduled to begin march 1. it is including tax changes. the president spoke to reporters for just over five minutes. >> good afternoon, everybody. i wanted to say a few words about the looming deadlines and decisions that we face on our budget and on our deficit, and these are decisions that will have real and lasting impacts on the strength and pace of our recove
stood here as your new governor wisconsin was facing a $3.6 billion budget deficit. property taxes had gone up 27% over the previous decade, increasing every year and the unemployment rate was 7.8%. today wisconsin has a $34 million surplus. property taxes on median value home went down each. last two years the unemployment rate, well, it is down to 6.7%. [applause] we're turning things around. we're heading in the right direction. we're moving wisconsin forward. and unlike other states we avoided significant tax increases, massive layoffs and cuts in programs like medicaid. instead we put in place long-term structural reforms that helped us balance state and local government budgets for years to come. what we did was think more about the next generation than we did about the next election and it worked. but the first time in our state's history we set machine any aside in two consecutive years for the rainy day fund. our bond rating is solid and our pension system is the only one in the country that is fully funded. [applause] we made tough but prudent decisions to get our fiscal hous
of the administration, the deficit tripled, the previous record high deficit in this country, to $1.4 trillion. $1.3 trillion in f.y. 2010. $1.3 trillion in 2011, $1.2 trillion in f.y. 2012. and, mr. speaker, there's no plan that the administration has produced to get us from where we are, fiscal irresponsibility, to a point in the future of fiscal responsibility. mr. speaker, we've been doing our part here in the house, we've been proud to work together across the aisle in order to pass budgets that tackle those hard challenges that are ahead of us. if you go and read the president's comments, mr. speaker, you'll see that he recognized the challenges are hard. the question is, are we going to deal with those or not? i hold here, mr. speaker, a speech that the president made to the democratic national convention on september 6, 2012. where he said this, i will use the money that we're no longer spending on war to pay down our debt and put more people back to work. and my notes here said it was followed by extended cheers and applause. i suspect my friend from massachusetts supports that spirit who
" is next. host: the federal deficit is expected to dip below one trillion. the news comes as republicans and democrats face a march 1 deadline to avoid billions in across-the-board spending cuts. the pentagon announced it will offer benefits to same-sex couples. in the senate is wrapping up work on the violence against women act. and the house will vote on a bill requiring the president to offer a plan to balance the federal budget in 10 years. good morning. we begin with your take on the leaked white paper from the white house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote t
with some of my republican friends is that we'rewe all want to fix the deficit problem. there is no question. but i think, when they have a chance to look at this bill and understand what we're really facing, i don't think we will have a problem. >> how is this different from the proposal from a year ago? >> did we have a pay freeze a year ago? [laughter] >> it is different. the house had the attrition of the workforce that is in this component. we had a combination -- instead of every three positions that came open. we had two. and a combination of overall across the federal government over a year. this is different here it combines both so we're on the same page. and we have the house proposal on nutrition and we added congressional pay freeze on it. >> what makes you think this time around that the senate majority leader will take up this proposal? >> i would certainly defer to the chairman, but there is a real urgency here. one of the reasons that the president and the administration, during this campaign, didn't want the actual warrant act, the law that requires to notify workers that t
that we need higher fuel tax, and we can use that either to reduce the deficit or to pay for something else. it was designed -- or intended -- whether it has done so successfully or not, it was done to pay for infrastructure. >> absolutely. we are not real happy about that. >> john, what are you hoping for next week? >> for some reason, i have not been consulted on that. the president in the campaign said he was 4 and all of the above energy policy, so let's have some announcements that support that -- he was for an " all of the above" energy policy. let's move forward with the things that you need to do to accomplish that policy. i would say that we would also -- i would like to see stop this discussion about taxing the industry and trying to characterize it as subsidies, which is simply not true, and i would like to see more opportunities in terms of where we can open up areas that are off-limits right now. all those combined can generate an enormous amount of opportunity for the economy right when we need it. >> i will just mention a couple of things. i think lenders have been reall
are in for a massive and unsustainable increasing deficit if we don't get a handle on entitlements. good morning. glad to have you with us. gregg: the cbo is saying it deficit will go down to $840 billion. that's the first time it will drop a trillion dollars under president obama. martha: but with baby boomers retiring at the rate of 10,000 people a day. entitlement spending is set to explode. stuart, as we pointed out, there is a lot of enthusiasm that we won't rack up a trillion dollar deficit. >> reporter: the headline was all about the deficit is going to be below a trillion dollars. that's great news. the bad news and there is a lot of it. the next 10 years medicare will cost $1 trillion a year. obama-care subsidies will total nearly a trillion dollars. the cost of medicaid will double and the debt will go to the highest portion of tour economy than it's been in a generation. there is dismal views on the current state of the economy. 1.4% growth this year and the unemployment rate will rise at 8% and stay that way for years to come. martha: the cbo makes very clear we need to do some entitlement
advising, we can replace the sequester with a smarter strategy that is a more gradual deficit reduction plan. he's going disagree with the republicans on how to do that. he's going to want revenue to be part of it. republicans will say no thank you. >> we'll get the president if a minute and a half. white house gave us a two-minute warning. i would say it's a short-term for the president and the congress not doing what they're supposed to do pass a budget every year. the president set up the sequester, a fiscal negotiations -- >> this is not a natural disaster. >> it's not a natural disaster. >> man-made. >> many ways the president's late submitting his own budget but coming to the podium because though he's part of the mess he thinks he has the upper hand. >> right. i'm having a world is upside down moment. when you talk to house republicans they say to you, you know what? this may be the best budget cuts we can get. let the sequester take effect, even if it cuts the military, the secretary and defense, leon panetta saying that would be shameful. but you have a lot of house republicans
proposals for deficit reduction. the president told super bowl fans reducing the deficit will require more taxes. >> can we combine some smart spending cuts because there's still some waste in government, can we reform our health care programs in particular and can we close loopholes and productions that folks who are well connected and have a lot of accountants can take advantage of. there's no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. >> president also warned congress about the danger of alowing the sequester to go into effect. >> washington cannot continually operate under a cloud of crisis. that freezes up consumers, gets businesses worried. we can't afford the self-inflicted wounds. >> no another tweet david plouffe said message delivered to big audience on balanced budget, deficit reduction, economy growth. on abc, an unlikely name was invoked for direction. >> i think what we need to do is do some things mitt romney taungd abo talked about. he said there are tax loopholes that should be closed. there are efforts being
for a short-term deal to avoid these budget cuts. congress must find $85 billion in deficit reduction somewhere by march 1st. otherwise, pentagon spending would shrink by 7.9%. domestic spending by 5.3% and medicare would take a 2% reduction. the president prefers an option that raises more money by closing tax loopholes. republicans want to stick with spending cuts only. a study by george mason university estimated that 448,000 jobs in d.c., maryland and virginia could be affected by automatic indiscriminate budget cuts. business leaders and local congressmen are concerned about the impact on our economy. >> and sequestration will hurt not only the defense side but the non-defense side. my committee funds the f.b.i. there will probably be furloughs at the f.b.i. there will be furloughs potentially at the national cancer institute, at nih. this thing has ramifications for defense and non-defense. >> reporter: the cuts were originally scheduled to kick in january 1st because congress couldn't grow on a broad package to reduce the deficit several times in 2011 and 2012 in excomping for
the deficit and avoid spending cuts. we're learning the budget deficit will top $845 billion this fiscal year even with massive tax hikes and assuming the spending cuts do kick in. congressman tom price pushing the president to balance the budget and says this new report is proof we can't do that by hiking taxes. what about that? we're still going to be deep into the red. >> good to be with you. the president has put forward for different budgets, none of which have ever come to balance. the house republicans have acted responsibly, our budget is yet to balance, so what we will do is put together a budget that balances in a ten-year time. all it does tomorrow it says to the president tell us when you'ryourbudget balances. it is important to do that because we have our principled solutions with the program. liz: used a dozen state when the budget would be balanced, is that it? >> we have had to end dollars deficit of the past four years in the past for budgets by this president have never come into balance ever in the 75 year time frame we talk about budgets. the american people need to know t
apiece saying how the trust deficit is hurting the economy. what are you trying to say about that? guest: we usually do not talk about trust deficits. talk about trade, budget deficits, things we can measure. i'm talking about a breakdown of trust in american society, in particular in the institutions that make our economy go. when you look at measures of trust from surveys like a gallup or the pugh institute -- the pew institute, or even newspapers, congress, large corporations, banks, public schools, they have all been going down for many years. for a lot of them, this decline in trust was intensified leading up to and going into the financial crisis. there are a lot of reasons for these things we can talk about. what we were trying to get at in the story that -- is that this matters to the economy, and trust breaks down. there was nobel prize-winning economist who 40 years ago said that every commercial transaction has within it an element of trust. when you trust your counter party, you're more likely to engage in a transaction. when trust begins to fray, and people become suspicious
the deficit instead but it didn't happen. house republicans poind out they passed a bill to replace the sequester with cuts to federal worker pay, food stamps and other programs. democrats say that puts the burden on poor and middle class americans to pay for debt reduction. >> remember the american people still believe by an overwhelming margin that the rich should contribute to this. >> reporter: republicans argue democrats have no plan for replacing the sequester beyond eliminating tax breaks for corporate jet owners and oil companies. >> these aren't real solutions, mr. president. they're poll tested gimmicks. >> reporter: the cuts were originally supposed to kick in last month, but a last-minute deal pushed them off for two months. the president is meeting at this hour with labor leaders later this afternoon with business leaders and the subject, norah and charlie, is sure to come up. >> nancy cordes thanks. >>> meantime house majority leader eric cantor will be outlining a new agenda for his party today calling for change. he wants republicans to focus
with smarter spending reductions to bring down the deficit. we can do it in a gradual way so that there is less of an impact. these deductions that certain folks can take advantage of, the average person cannot. not everyone has access to cayman island accounts, the average person does not have access to carry interest income, where they wind up paying a much lower rate on the billions that they earned. we want to make sure that the whole system is fair and transparent and that we are reducing our deficit in a way that does not hamper growth and reduce the kinds of strategies that we need in order to make sure that we are creating a strong middle-class. host: jim from south carolina, on the republican line, good morning. caller: how are you? host: well, thank you. caller: you keep mentioning and hearing people talking about pensions, but pensions are just invested the same way that 401k is. stocks and bonds. people with pensions lost money as well. i heard cases where people were not going to get as much money. if someone is manages their 401k, i do not know, it needs to be managed properly and
? the deficit. this year it will be below a trillion dollars, that's what the pundits focused on and ignored the grim reality. in fact, our debt is headed toward the worst levels in post war america. worst, the economy will show a masly 1.4% growth. unemployment rise to 8%, stay at very high levels for years, and 7 million people will lose their health care coverage under obamacare. that came within hours of president obama's call for more tax increases on the rich and put off spending cuts. tax and spend, it lives on and so does our massive debt. reality check, "varney & company" is about to begin. [ shapiro ] at legalzoom, you can take care of virtually all your imptant legal matters in just minutes. protect youramily... and launch your dreams. at we put the law on your side. >> first up this wednesday morning, gas prices, yes, they are still on the rise. national average for regular up more than a penny, now at 3.54. just in the past month the price of gas spiked about 25 cents a gallon. the underlying price of oil right now we're down, $95 per barrel. while gas prices are
street journal," chief economic correspondent. welcome. you wrote a piece saying how the trust deficit is hurting the economy. what we're trying to do? >> guest: we usually talk about things but budget deficits and trade deficits with things we can measure. what i'm talking about is the breakdown of trust in american society. it would take her in institutions that make our economy go. when you look at measures of trust from surveys by gallup for the pew institute that americans have, it's a very important institution including the media newspaper, television, congress, banks, large corporations, public school, public union. if all been going down for many years and allowed them, declining interest intensified leading up to and going into the financial crisis and there's a lot of reasons for the things we can talk about. but what were chained to get out of the story is this matters economy but trust breaks down. a nobel prize-winning economist named kenneth arrow for 40 years ago set every commercial transaction hasn't been a bad element of trust when you trust your counterparty come ne
with a record debt and deficit, threat of global warming, threat of global poverty, of pandemics, of national security challenges like continuing war on terrorism, the instability of iran and north korea, rising powers, turmoil across the middle east, turmoil in north africa, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the growing threat of cyberattacks. how we confront these problems, how we deal with these challenges will in many ways determine that future course of america. it will determine whether the united states will be a leader in the 21st century or whether we will be just another failed empire in history. to succeed we will depend on the resilience of our economy, the strength of our diplomatic and military institutions and above all, the effectiveness of our political system that underpins in many ways what we do as a country. and that brings me to what i see as perhaps the most urgent task facing this nation and facing all of us and that is overcoming the partisan dysfunction in congress that poses a threat to our quality of life, to our national security, to our economy
of where we stand and where we're going. the 2013 deficit standing at $845 billion. last year it was $1.1 trillion. so obviously we're going in the right direction. but they do give a grim fast if there is a type of austerity measure that is in place while the economy remains very fragile. >> well, that's right. there are two things we have to work on at the same time. the most important thing is to make sure that we continue to see an economic recovery, that we do what we can to accelerate that recovery, put more people back to work. and the sequester would undercut that effort, because if you take that much money out of the economy very rapidly in this across-the-board way, it will result in lost jobs, which is why we proposed this alternative. now over the longer term, there's no doubt we have to reduce our deficit, but we have to do it in a smart and balanced way as the president has said, and that's why we have proposed a combination of cuts and we've already done $1.5 trillion in cuts as part of the budget control act and other action. we did some revenue as part of the most recen
've tried and tried and passed two measures to try to replace the sequester to go about managing the deficit whittling down the entitlement programs so we can save them. instead here we are again and the president says no, we've got to raise taxes. and the same strategy vilify the rich and i suppose don't raise the taxes on the rich and people are happy to do that and that the republicans want to cut programs that try, why would anyone who is in these programs or thinks he might have this program why would that ever be appealing to go the republican way. >> and first of all, we understand that the president is not led on this issue and there's no response whatsoever, and just raising taxes and to say that you can tax the rich and get rid of the problem it's fictional. and i believe we're for fiscal discipline, managing down the debt and deficit for a reason because we don't want a debt crisis to implode this country and our economy because if you see interest rates jack up because all of a sudden our debt is unsustainable. that means families will have to pay more every month in their mortga
the deficit. all by honoring the wish of 2/3 of americans to respect states' rights for marijuana just like we do for alcohol. i would invite my colleagues to join this effort in developing a marijuana policy that makes sense for america today. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from north carolina, mr. coble, for five minutes. mr. coble: i thank the speaker. mr. speaker, january is the traditional month in which new year's resolutions are developed. i'm suggesting that president obama and mrs. boim adopt a resolution -- mrs. obama adopt a resolution. it appears to me, mr. speaker, regard air force one very casually and i believe on some occasions two planes, at least two planes go to the same destination. air force one, mr. speaker, belongs to president and mrs. obama. but air force one also belongs to the american taxpayer. and i would welcome a new year's resolution that would provide generous lace of all future air force one dispatches with prudence, discipline and last but certainly not least fiscal austerity. america's taxpayers will be
to lower the devers, but americans do not -- to lower the deficit, but americans do not support sacrificing real spenged cuts for more tax hikes. the president's sequester should be replaced with spending cuts and reforms that put us on a path to balance a budget over the next 10 years. the american people believe that the tax question has been settled. they know the president called for a balanced approach to the debt. combination of revenues and spending cuts, and they know he's gotten his revenue. the american people do not believe the president will use further tax revenues to lower the debt. and haven't seen this president attempt to spend his way into prosperity over the last four years, they know he'll spend it. the president doesn't believe we have a spending problem. he general winly believes the government -- genuinely believes the government spending causes economic growth. if that were true, the economy today would be thriving. it isn't thriving. the unemployment rate is still nearly 8% and rising. small businesses like the one i ran are struggling. middle class families, those
times" economist argued why the u.s. should spend now and worry about deficit reduction later. here it is. >> dashing spending when you still have depressed economy is really destructive. it's probably even counterproductive even in purely fiscal terms. we should be sustaining government spending until we have a stronger economic recovery. >> this is not a hard call. as long as we have 4 million people who have been unemployed for more than a year, this is not a time to be worrying about reducing the budget deficit. give me something that looks more like a normal employment situation and i'll become a deficit hawk but not now. >> do you subscribe to that, jared? or is that too extreme? >> not at all. i think paul's exactly right. paul and i share the following thing. we're deficit doves in a down economy, and deficit hawks in a strong economy. at a time like this, what you really need is faster growth. by the way, not only will that help put more people to work, but it will actually help reduce your budget deficit ironically because those people will be working, paying taxes, they w
whether or not psycho paths have affective deficits. absolutely they do. there has been hundreds of years of psychiatric research shows that they do. you have this two prong thing. on the one hand more dangerous if you release them and don't treat them. on the other hand, they're affectively different. there was a very nice article in the "new york times" magazine on mother's day about children who have these emerging traits and how we would develop and understand and treat them. it's a small percentage. my goal is to develop better treatment so they can keep them off that trajectory towards life course persistent problems. >> are you saying that people that have the brain structure that you have identified will always be lacking in volitional control or impulse receive to the extent that they are criminals? do we have a subset of people that are criminals because of their brains? >> i should really differentiate psychopathy from criminality. there are a lot of reasons why individuals engage in different criminal activity. it's a very small percentage of prisoners that are just about 15 t
million budget deficit over the next decade pause of a growing gap -- because of a dproaing gap in how much the city earns and how much it spends. that deficit would be even bigger at $2 billion if you factor in what the city needs for infrastructure repairs and retiree healthcare benefits. according to the report, if the city does not enact major reforms it, will go bankrupt. the 10-year forecast was commissioned by the city from an outside firm in philly. mayor rawlings blake is expected to propose financial reforms next week based on that report. linda stow, abc 2 news. >>> it was a party bigger than anything we have ever seen. more than 200,000 people gathered to celebrate the super bowl champions, the baltimore ravens. you better believe, though, a big story was traffic congestion. it caused huge delays. in fact, the players, the coaches, the lombardi trophy, that's why they were late to start the parade in the first place. they finally made it to the start of city hall where things kicked off and with the help of the maryland national guard, things got moving. the team rolled th
a trillion dollar deficit. dagen: don't you think that the democrats will continue to fall back on raising taxes even more than they already have? it is nothing compared to the $7 trillion in additional debt. >> this is not a solution to our problems. i think they have used this to great political advantage. that is indisputable. that is not a solution as to where the budget has to go. what will the senate democrats put in their budget? what will it look like? they will not be able to raise taxes and solve the problem. the taxes will not work. they do not want to reform entitlements. dagen: there is a growing chorus among many people in this country that our debt is not that much of a problem because we have had these low, low, almost record low interest rates at this point. ultimately, if the fed decides we are worried about inflation and begins to withdraw some of this money out of the system, will that be the day of reckoning? >> that will be a very bad day if it happens. you are hearing democrats say we have made a lot of progress, we just need to do a little bit more. connell: do you
, he talked about the economy. when it comes to tackling the nation's deficit, president obama said sunday in an interview with cbs news there needs to be revenue involved. and it sounds like he might be interested in going after people like mitt romney. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way so that it doesn't have a huge impact. and as i said, when you look at some of these deductions that certain folks are able to take advantage of, the average person can't take advantage of them. the average person doesn't have access to cayman island accounts. the average person doesn't have access to carried interest income where they end up paying a much lower rate on billions of dollars that they've earned. so we just want to make sure that the whole system is fair. >> all right. steve, help me out here. i think the democrats are holding a losing hand if they come back and ask for more taxes. they talk about raising tax rates on anybody. but if we're talking about closing loo
out of washington to get our deficits under control. hopefully, we do not have to many quarters where we end up in negative territory. this is not an economy growing six percent and can hinder those bibles easily. host: magnolia, texas, david, better. caller: [indiscernible]we are doing great here. i noticed the super bowl is forming dollars per minute. everything is packed. all of the football stadiums. i do not see any recession. host: you said you are doing better why? caller: i live 15 miles from where they are building the number one country in the world. we are getting roads. it is unbelievable around here. we have job signs everywhere. as far as the savings, when interest rates are 1.5%, who will put their money in the bank? bernanke wants you to put it in stocks. that is why there is no interest rate. i took my money for years ago when i bought those rifles. i have made so much money on them. it is unbelievable. host: he mentioned social security. there is a category about the social safety net. guest: we use the term government social benefits to cover quite a few different p
washington, a grand bergan encompassing deficit reduction with tax reform, entime reform and deschristianry spending reforms in areas like debt. extension of the debt ceiling for two years. clarification on europe. first, the recession needs to stabilize, but beyond that, policy initiatives clearly indicate a road to political and fiscal and banking reforms and an indication that europe is serious about improving competitiveness. resumption of growth in emerging economies, like china, and finally the federal successfully engineering a modest increase in interest rates without unleashing runaway inflation. maria, these are tall orders, i know, but resolution of all these issues would be a huge boost to business confidence, capital expenditures and hiring would increase dramatically and revenues would rise, and that's what we need, maria. back to you. >> that's some list, bob. >> pretty ambitious. >> we'll be watching that. not everybody is buying into this bull market theory, by the way. pimco's bill gross is actually warning investors to be afraid, and i mean very afraid, of how inflation a
in my view are willing to basically deficit spend and run us into a fiscal problem. republicans are unwilling to touch revenue so say let -- let's deficit spend and democrats are unwilling to address government spending so they deficit spend. both sides which is why this country does not trust washington. >> i want to get quickly to another issue, chuck hagel's confirmation hearing this week. not even the white house would defend his performance. here's a piece of it. >> i support the president's strong position on containment, as i said. if i said that, meant to say that i -- obviously his position on containment, we don't have a position on containment. >> we do have a position on containment, which is that we do not favor containment. >> he was kind of a surprise there from chuck hagel, probably not going to hurt his chances of confirmation, is even getting some republicans -- >> i think he's going to make it but if you have to clarify your clarification, you're in trouble, no. i mean if we compare, for instance, what he went through with what hillary clinton did with the ben
a debate whether we take a balanced approach to deficit reduction as you described. one that asks the wealthiest americans to pay a bit more while making sure we reduce spending and make responsible spending cuts without cutting the legs out from under the economy. and i'm sure mr. bernstein would agree that as the economist i heard when i was a member of the budget committee repeatedly say that you can't cut so much so fast because in a recovery that is already more fragile than we'd like to see, you want to make sure you don't slow or stall that recovery. that's what the republicans are risking. it's really -- you know, i wish and i know that americans across the country wish that there would just be a massive outbreak of responsibility in the republican conference so that we could bring them to the table, sit down, and work together to avoid massive spending cuts which they seem willing to allow to happen. >> a massive outbreak of responsibility. wouldn't that be a great occurrence? let me ask you, jared. you may agree, but senator mitch mcconnell clearly doesn't seem to agree.
is going through, and where he is taking the country. by playing on the republican field of deficits and debts instead of joblessness or say we're all trying to compromise, you make people feel everyone is equally involved in a gridlock that has led to a point where congress has a lower popularity rating than the banks. that is a feat. 9%. it is dropping even though there are good people inside the congress. there is a progressive congress. they put out a people's budget. bernie sanders has exposed the fed giving out trillions of dollars in addition to the tarp bailout. >> barney frank has taken a hike. >> that is worth talking about. you see in this congress michele bachmann and michele bachmann one of these -- wannabe's. there are fights about redistricting. >> use of the one strength the president obama, his rhetorical skill, is not sufficient. >> it has not been used at the scale necessary in this time of crisis. america is in a crossroads. this is a moment comparable to coming out of the great depression. this was a moment coming out of the financial crisis when tectonic shifts
in the budget, but he says that he wants to ask congress to find a way to reduce the deficit in a balanced way to avoid these deep and indiscriminate cuts the large measure of which would come from the department of defense. we'll get you more on that, 12:15 the president will be speaking. a young girl's fight for her life spreading a message against taliban oppression, what an amazing story this is. we now hear from the 15-year-old girl from pakistan who was shot for just wanting to go to school. gregg: a florida teenage store did not take her court appearance very seriously until the judge laid down the law, but it's what she said that actually got her more time in the slammer. >> count one would be 10,000. >> are you serious? >> i am serious. adios. [bleep] >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life upside down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you 15% today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they can open bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your mon
budget office that for the first time since president obama has been in office, we can see a deficit under $1 trillion. $884 billion is what they are suggesting. they think unemployment will go up through the next couple of years, but federal revenue, the amount of money coming into the government going up by 25%, in part, because of the fiscal cliff deal. also because the economy is improving. richard? >> tracie, we'll take under 1 trillion right now. thank you. >>> a major decision expected today from the boy scouts of america. national board members set to vote on whether to lift a decade's long band on gay leaders and scouts. the final day of a three-day meeting of officials. a controversial issue drawing fire from both sides and putting one of the country's largest youth organizations under a microscope. president obama said over the weekend that scouting should be open to everyone while texas governor rick perry expressed the opposite opinion. if board members scrap that policy, they will be able to decide for themselves to admit gays to their ranks there. >>> on the heels of t
. but that we're looking at the smallest budget deficit since president obama has been in office, well under $1 trillion at $845 billion. and they say federal revenue, going up 25% in part because of that fiscal cliff deal. >>> well, a major decision expected from the boy scouts of america. national board members set to vote on whether to leave the decades-long ban on gay leaders and scouts. in texas, it is a controversial issue drawing fire from both sides and putting one of the country's largest youth organizations under a microscope. president obama said over the weekend scouting should be open to everyone while texas governor rick perry expressed the opposite opinion. local scout units will be able to decide on whether to leave gays to their ranks. and on the heels, the pentagon is announcing a policy shift. leon panetta is expected to expand some benefits to granting access to various spots on bases are said to be included. however, it remains droughtful that mental, dental, housing allowances would be offered under the new proposal. an extension of those benefits would require an appeal o
: the dow hitting 14,000 with nicole on the air. this is a snapshot of just how bad our deficits are going to be over the next ten years. dagen: rich edson is live in washington, d.c. rich: $1.1 trillion, that was our deficit for 2012. this is the most recent projections by the office. this year, a budget deficit -- the decade production was $2.26 trillion. these numbers will be much different. much worse. it must examine the budget as if congress does absolutely nothing. and current policy continues. we have had some changes. mainly that built that passed congress earlier in the year. millions of middle-class americans do not have to pay the amt. it also changed the estate tax bumping down the rate of little bit lower than what it had been over the exception of little bit higher. the numbers we just show you, the real numbers will be much worse. we will find out at 1:00 o'clock. back to you. dagen: are we going to be in a statement from the white house at 1:15 p.m.? rich: he will talk about the sequester. he will push for congress to pass a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reform
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